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English

English Staff
Dr R Lodge (Head of Team) rlodge@conyers.org.uk Miss J Shaw jshaw@conyers.org.uk
Mrs L O’Neill loneill@conyers.org.uk Miss B Moore bmoore@conyers.org.uk
Mrs L Dalgarno ldalgarno@conyers.org.uk Mr B Edkins bedkins@conyers.org.uk
Mr S Ferguson sferguson@conyers.org.uk Miss E Richardson erichardson@conyers.org.uk
Mrs N Farrow nfarrow@conyers.org.uk Mr J Gallacher  jgallacher@conyers.org.uk
Miss M Smith msmith@conyers.org.uk

Please select the links below to view further information about the department. The assessment programme explains how and what the students will be assessed on along with information on how to prepare.

  • Key Stage 4
  • A Level English Language
  • A Level English Literature
  • Year 7 Assessment
  • Year 8 Assessment
  • Year 9 Assessment

GCSE English Language and English Literature

Introduction to Course

All students study for two GCSEs in English: English Language and English Literature. English Language involves reading and responding to a range of texts, from websites to novels.  Your writing is assessed in two exams. In English Literature, you read and respond to a Shakespeare play, a classic novel, a modern play and a selection of poetry.

Skills

You need to be able to :

  • Read with understanding and write your responses to your reading.
  • Write accurately and creatively.

Speak fluently and listen attentively.

Units or course structure

English Language Examinations – 2 writing tasks, questions on unseen fiction and non-fiction texts. English Literature Examinations – responses to a Shakespeare play, a modern play, a classic novel, a range of poems, unseen poems.

Assessment

English Language                                            Examination – 2 papers Speaking and Listening assessment – separate grade awarded English Literature Examination – 2 papers

Exam Board: AQA

What is English Language?

Why do men talk such rubbish? How do adverts position us into accepting the lies of capitalism? What is significant about the way someone writes a shopping list? In this subject, we study language in everyday use. So, you will gain insight into how people speak and write in real life situations. Degree providers and employers love the understanding of communication issues that the course gives you. Being a thoughtful, skeptical, knowledgeable reader of language will help you to study any subject at degree level and help you to communicate more effectively with clients and employees. As part of the course, you also get to write your own creative pieces. Again writing skills are valued in universities and places of work. Plus – it’s fun! You will: Analyse everything from a crisp packet to a poem. Learn about grammar, lexis and pragmatics—what’s that?? Analyse spoken language. Learn how to hold a cooperative conversation. Analyse how gender, dialects and social groups impact on language

Why study it?

It is challenging, new and varied. You get to look at real life issues and examine a really wide variety of texts. You get to do your own writing on topics of your own choice and in styles of your own choice. Lessons tend to be interactive and imaginative.

The structure of the course

Year 12—Course

In the first year of the course, you will be introduced to new terminology and explore different ways of analysing language use in a range of texts. You will also study how language is affected by gender, occupations and social groups. Do men speak differently to women? Is language inherently sexist? Why do people from Newcastle speak like that??? In writing, you will create your own newspaper, magazine and webpage articles.

Year 13 —Course

In the second year of the course, you will look at how children learn language. It’s amazing! How does that helpless demanding lump of babyness become the fluent, articulate teenager that you see when you look in the mirror? You also look at how language has changed over time. Did you know that the word “guy” comes from Guy Fawkes or that “flirt” used to mean to flick something away or flick a fan? In Year 13 you get to do your own research into something like the language of a TV show such as Friends or why men interrupt so much. And you get to write your own creative piece—fictional diaries in the Bridget Jones style have been very popular choices for this part of the course.

What next?

Studying A-Level English Language can be extremely valuable if you wish to pursue a career in the following:

  • Advertising
  • Journalism
  • Publishing
  • Education
  • Business and management

Exam Board: AQA

What is English Literature?

English Literature is a key A Level – seen as a great platform for all kinds of degree subject and career. It’s a quality A Level with depth and challenge. Many degree providers value this subject especially, because having a qualification in English Literature means that you can read complex texts with understanding – a quality needed for Law or Philosophy, or indeed most degree subjects, which often require students to read widely in secondary literature, found in journals and theoretical texts. On this course, you explore ideas about everything from love to death and all points in between. You discuss language, structure, form. You explore the historical and social contexts of texts. You write essays examining the style and concerns of texts.

Why study it?

It is inspiring, life-changing, and life-shaping. You will encounter ideas that you have never dreamed of. You will be taken to exotic locations. You will meet fascinating characters. You will develop your appreciation of literature—and from that you will develop your appreciation of all art and all life.

The structure of the course

Year 12 — Course

In the first year of the course, you will study a range of classic texts including a play by Shakespeare. Texts: Othello– thrilling tale of jealousy and murder Tess of D’Urbervilles– passionate story about love and betrayal Death of a Salesman- the American dream turned sour The theme of the course in Year 12 is tragedy—it’s an emotional journey, but one that will leave you changed and purged and uplifted. And our results have been brilliant!

Year 13 — Course

In the second year of the course, you will extend your study of texts to include more connecting of different texts. You will study some classic poetry and will prepare for unseen passages on the exam. You will also complete some coursework in Year 13—for example, two essays on texts chosen by you and your teacher, relating the texts to particular critical schools—such as feminism. Texts: Othello, Tess and Death of a Salesman from Year 12 Poems by William Blake Henry IV part 1 The Kite Runner Coursework: Beloved and poems by Tennyson The theme of this year is social and political protest—so let’s get out there and make a stand for justice and freedom!

What next?

Studying A-Level English Literature can be extremely valuable if you wish to pursue a career in the following:

  • Publishing
  • Education
  • Writing
  • Law
  • English Literature is an inspiring subject, which will provide you with more than just a career—it will shape your self.

If you have any further questions regarding English Literature, please feel free to contact us on the details as shown below.

Year 7 Assessment

Term 1: Sparking the Gap

Students study a range of non-fiction and fiction texts from 19th Century onward, all centred around the theme of school.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse language and structural choices made by James Joyce. This is a reading assessment that lasts for 1 hour- students write an essay response to a statement about the text using PETAL structure. Student will be given a planning lesson to prepare.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Revise language and structure terminology
  • Ensure plan completed in lesson is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing 1-2 PETAL (Point, evidence, technique, analyse and link) paragraphs
Final assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write a non-fiction text. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour – students write a newspaper article based on previous reading and research. Students will be given a planning lesson to prepare.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise sophisticated writing skills gained from Y6 and the unit so far:

-Using a variety of accurate punctuation -Varied sentence and paragraph lengths for effect -Ambitious vocabulary choices -Varied sentence openers

  • Review plan completed in lesson and ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing an engaging introduction and one main paragraph
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses

Term 2: Haroun and the Sea of Stories

Students read and study the full novel written by Salman Rushdie. (Note: Some classes will study the Poetry unit in HT2 instead.)

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment: (Writing) To assess the ability to write to describe. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write a detailed character description.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise and practise using imaginative descriptive devices (similes, metaphors, personification)
  • Revise key characterisation methods (dialogue, description, action, character relationships)
  • Practise writing a descriptive paragraph about a character from the novel
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses
Final assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to write an analytical essay about a character from the novel. This is a literature essay assessment that lasts for 2 hours. Students analyse the depiction of a character in the novel Haroun and the Sea of Stories.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Revise language terminology
  • Revise characterisation methods
  • Review plan completed in lesson and ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise exploring key quotations and/or writing 1-2 PETAL (Point, evidence, technique, analyse and link) paragraphs

Term 3: Poetry ‘This is England’

Students study an anthology of poems all centred on the theme of ‘This is England’(Note: Some classes will study the Novel unit in HT3 instead.).

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment: (Reading) Assess the ability to analyse the language and structure of a poem. This is a literature essay assessment that lasts for 1 hour and students will be given a planning lesson to prepare.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Revise language and structure poetic terminology
  • Re-read annotated poem- add more detailed annotations if necessary.
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs
Final assessment: (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse and compare poems. This is a literature essay assessment that lasts for 1 hour and students are required to compare ‘Last Lesson in the Afternoon’ by D H Lawrence and ‘The Schoolboy’ by William Blake.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • AO4- Make comparisons between texts
  • Revise language and structure poetic terminology
  • Re-read annotated poems
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or comparative PETAL paragraphs

Term 4: I’m a reader, I’m a writer

Students develop narrative writing skills and ultimately write their own short story.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write an engaging opening to a short story. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to draft and write an engaging opening to their planned short stories.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Continue to read short stories (visit Mrs Dawson in the library for short story recommendations that suit your reading tastes)
  • Act on feedback given from your teacher a re-draft sections of your story
  • Ensure a clear and detailed 5-point plan has been produced for short story idea (arresting opening, development, problem, crisis, satisfying resolution)
  • Have a clear sense of the characters and setting in your story- mind map details about them. Remember: small time frame and only 1-2 characters and settings
  • Practise drafting your full story
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses
Final assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write a complete short story. This is a written assessment that lasts 2 hours. Students are expected to write a full short story using effective structural and language choices.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Continue to read short stories (visit Mrs Dawson in the library for short story recommendations that suit your reading tastes)
  • Act on feedback given from your teacher a re-draft sections of your story
  • Ensure a clear and detailed 5-point plan has been produced for short story idea (arresting opening, development, problem, crisis, satisfying resolution)
  • Have a clear sense of the characters and setting in your story- mind map details about them. Remember: small time frame and only 1-2 characters and settings
  • Practise drafting your full story
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses

Term 5: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Students study ones of Shakespeare’s famous Comedies.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse a key character from A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Oberon). This is a literature essay assessment that lasts for 1 hour and students are required to complete PETAL character study essay about Oberon.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Revise the character of Oberon- what is he like? What is his purpose in the play? How does he contrast with other characters? What is his relationships with other characters? What is his language like? Use Sparknotes to help with this à http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/msnd/
  • Create a mind map of key Oberon quotations and explore them
  • Revise language techniques
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs
End of Year 7 Exam (Reading) To assess students’ reading skills which have been developed throughout Y7. Students will write an essay response to a Literature GCSE-style exam question on a key theme or character in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. WEEK BEGINNING 4 JUNE 2018
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology

AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written

  • Revise the key characters in MSND- what are they like? What are their purposes in the play? How do they contrast with other characters? What are their relationships with other characters? What is their language like? Use Sparknotes to help with this à http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/msnd/
  • Revise the key themes in MSND- what are they? What is the importance of each? What role do they have in the play? Use Sparknotes to help with this à http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/msnd/
  • Create a mind map of key quotations for each character and explore them
  • Revise language techniques
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs

Term 6: GCSE Preparation scheme

Students develop their English Language and English Literature skills in readiness for GCSE style exam

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Whilst there are no formal assessments for this unit of work, students will be regularly informally assessed on the GCSE Literature and Language skills which will be developed throughout the unit.
  • All Literature and Language Assessment Objectives will be developed during this unit.
  • In order to support the class work of the unit, students can consolidate the skills acquired in the lessons through producing revision resources such as detailed mind maps.
  • It will also benefit students to read widely in order to support this unit. This could include non-fiction and fiction texts such as novels, autobiographies, short stories, magazine articles etc.

 

Year 8 Assessment

Term 1: Epic English

Students study a range of fictional extracts from 19th Century novels and poems, including Frankenstein and Dracula.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write fiction texts. This is a written assignment that lasts for 1 hour – students are required to write a description in the Gothic style prompted by an image (GCSE Language Paper 1 exam-style question). Student will have a planning lesson for this assessment.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise descriptive devices (similes, metaphors, personification, pathetic fallacy, 5 senses)
  • Revise the conventions of the horror/gothic genre
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing descriptive paragraphs about the image
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses
Final assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to fiction texts. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour- students are required to write a piece of narrative atmospheric writing based on the story of Dracula. Students will have a planning lesson for this assessment.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Work on writing targets given in interim assessment
  • Revise the conventions of the horror/gothic genre
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an engaging opening to your narrative piece

Term 2

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write with imagination and skill using the letter form. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour- students are required to write a letter from the perspective of one of the characters in the novel (Alem). Students will have a planning lesson for this assessment.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Work on writing targets from previous unit
  • Revise the letter form
  • Revise descriptive devices (similes, metaphors, personification, pathetic fallacy, 5 senses)
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an engaging opening to your letter
Final assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to write an analytical essay about an extract from a novel. This is a literature essay assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students analyse an extract from the novel Refugee Boy and will be given a planning lesson for this.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Summarise the plot to develop your understanding
  • Recap key moments in the novel and practise analysing their importance
  • Create mind maps for each key character which includes characteristics and key quotations
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs

Term 3: Stone Cold

Students study the full play which is adapted from Swindell’s novel. (Note: Some classes will study the Refugee Boy unit in HT3 instead.)

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write to describe. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write a detailed description prompted by an image (this is a GCSE Language Paper 1 writing-style question). Students will not receive a planning lesson for this.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise descriptive devices (similes, metaphors, personification, pathetic fallacy, 5 senses)
  • Practise writing descriptive paragraphs about homelessness (look up some images to inspire your writing)
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses
Final assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse the choices made by a playwright in a play. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour and students are required to explore the presentation of a key theme (deceit) in the play (this is a GCSE Literature Paper 1 style question). Students will receive a planning lesson for this assessment.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Revise the key theme of deceit in the play à produce a mind map of key moments/quotations relating to this theme and explore the importance of them.
  • Recap the plot of the play to develop understanding
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs

Term 4: Dickens

Students study a range of extracts from Dickens’ famous stories, including Oliver Twist and Great Expectations.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse how a short story is atmospheric. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour and students are required to write a PETAL essay response about how the story creates a ghostly atmosphere. Students will receive a planning lesson.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Work on reading skills targets from previous unit
  • Re-read the short story and ensure it is annotated in detail
  • Revise language and structure terminology
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs
Final assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write a fiction text. This is a written assessment that lasts 2 hours. Students are required to write their own short ghost story. Students will receive a planning lesson for this assessment.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Read a different short ghost story (e.g. The Monkey’s Paw)
  • Ensure a clear and detailed 5-point plan has been produced for your short ghost story idea (arresting opening, development, problem, crisis, satisfying resolution)
  • Have a clear sense of the characters and setting in your story- mind map details about them. Remember: small time frame and only 1-2 characters and settings
  • Practise drafting your full story or sections of it
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses

Term 5: Richard III

Students study one of Shakespeare’s famous Histories in full.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write a non-fiction text. This is a written assessment that lasts 1 hour. Students are required to write a newspaper article linking to the context of the play. Students will receive a planning lesson for this assessment.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise the conventions of newspaper articles
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Carry out further contextual research about Richard III
  • Practise writing up an engaging opening to your newspaper article and/or one main paragraph.
End of Year 8 Exam (Reading) To assess students’ reading skills which have been developed throughout Y8. Students will write an essay response to a Literature GCSE-style exam question on a key theme or character in Richard III. WEEK BEGINNING 21 MAY 2018
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Revise the key characters in Richard III- what are they like? What are their purposes in the play? How do they contrast with other characters? What are their relationships with other characters? What is their language like? Use Sparknotes to help with this à http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/richardiii/
  • Revise the key themes in Richard III- what are they? What is the importance of each? What role do they have in the play? Use Sparknotes to help with this  http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/richardiii/
  • Create a mind map of key quotations for each character and explore them
  • Revise language techniques
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs

Term 6: GCSE Preparation scheme

Students develop their English Language and English Literature skills in readiness for GCSE style

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Whilst there are no formal assessments for this unit of work, students will be regularly informally assessed on the GCSE Literature and Language skills which will be developed throughout the unit.
  • All Literature and Language Assessment Objectives will be developed during this unit.
  • In order to support the class work of the unit, students can consolidate the skills acquired in the lessons through producing revision resources such as detailed mind maps.
  • It will also benefit students to read widely in order to support this unit. This could include non-fiction and fiction texts such as novels, autobiographies, short stories, magazine articles etc.

 

Year 9 Assessment

Term 1: Words at War (Poetry)

Students study a range of war poems from the past and present

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to compare and contrast the key ideas in two poems. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write a comparative essay about ‘The Man He Killed’ and ‘The Charge of the Light brigade.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Re-read both poems and ensure they are annotated in detail
  • Revise language and structure poetic terminology (use your glossary)
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or comparative PETAL paragraphs
     

Term 2: Of Mice and Men

Students study the full novel written by John Steinbeck

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse how language is used by the author to present a character. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write an analytical essay about how Curley’s wife is presented.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Re-read the description of Curley’s wife and ensure it is fully annotated
  • Revise language and characterisation techniques
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs
Final assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to write in an evaluative style about Steinbeck’s narrative choices. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to respond to a statement about the power of George and Lennie’s relationship.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Re-read key scenes from the novel involving George and Lennie
  • Complete mind maps about George and Lennie including key characteristics and quotations
  • Revise language and structure techniques
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs

Term 3: Macbeth

Students study one of Shakespeare’s famous tragedies.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to analyse how a key character is presented in a play. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write an essay response about the character of Macbeth.
  • AO1- Read, understand and respond to texts
  • AO2- Analyse language, form and structure using relevant terminology
  • AO3- Show understanding of the contexts in which texts are written
  • Create a character mind map for Macbeth including key quotations and the effect of these
  • Use Sparknotes to revise the plot of Macbeth and the key character of Macbeth  http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/macbeth/
  • Revise language and structure techniques
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an essay introduction and/or PETAL paragraphs
Final assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write a non-fiction text. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write an article on ‘ambition’ for a school magazine.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise magazine conventions
  • Revise rhetorical/persuasive devices
  • Work on SPaG weaknesses
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an engaging opening and/or a main paragraph

Term 4: Non fiction

Students study a range of non-fiction texts from the 19th Century onwards in preparation for their English language GCSE

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write a non-fiction text. This is a written assessments that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write a blog piece about the role of marriage in modern society.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise blog form
  • Revise rhetorical devices/ language and structure techniques
  • Revisit plan completed in lesson to ensure it is detailed and thorough
  • Practise writing up an engaging opening and/or a main paragraph
Final assessment (Reading) To assess the ability to approach Paper 1 Section A (Q1, 2, 3 & 4). This is a written exam-style assessment which lasts for 1 hour. Students build up to the style of questions in the lessons prior to the assessment.
  • AO1: Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas; select and synthesise evidence from different texts
  • AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views
  • AO3: Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts
  • Revise Q1, 2, 3 & 4 approach (use class ppts and notes)
  • Practise writing in timed conditions
  • Use the texts studied so far in lessons and annotate them in more detail with a focus on each question

Term 5: Writing scheme

Students develop the ability to write to describe and write to narrate in preparative for GCSE.

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Interim assessment (Writing) To assess the ability to write to describe. This is a written assessment that lasts for 1 hour. Students are required to write a detailed description prompted by an image (this is a GCSE Language Paper 1 writing-style question). Students will not receive a planning lesson for this.
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise descriptive devices (similes, metaphors, personification, pathetic fallacy, 5 senses)
  • Practise writing descriptive paragraphs about homelessness (look up some images to inspire your writing)
  • Work on your SPaG weaknesses
End of Year 9 Exam To assess students’ writing skills developed throughout Y9, in particular the ability to plan and write a piece of narrative writing. This is a 2 hour exam GCSE-style assessment. Students will not receive a planning lesson for this. WEEK BEGINNING 11 JUNE 2018
  • AO5- Content and organisation
  • AO6- Technical accuracy
  • Revise SPaG skills
  • Revise narrative language and structure techniques
  • Practise planning short stories using the following prompts: a story about a missing woman, a story about a dare gone wrong, a story about some severe weather
  • Practise writing up sections (engaging opening, development, problem, crisis, satisfying resolution)
  • Draft a full short story

Term 6: GCSE Preparation scheme

Students develop their English Language and English Literature skills in readiness for GCSE style exam

Assessment Focus and Purpose Key Concepts/Skills Assessed Preparation/Key Areas to Revise
Whilst there are no formal assessments for this unit of work, students will be regularly informally assessed on the GCSE Literature and Language skills which will be developed throughout the unit. All Literature and Language Assessment Objectives will be developed during this unit.
  • In order to support the class work of the unit, students can consolidate the skills acquired in the lessons through producing revision resources such as detailed mind maps.
  • It will also benefit students to read widely in order to support this unit. This could include non-fiction and fiction texts such as novels, autobiographies, short stories, magazine articles etc.